speakers

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Dr. Jameel Ahmad has 26 years academic and research experience in the area of Electrical/Electronic/Telecommunication Engineering at undergraduate and graduate level in: Teaching, Research, Academic Management. He is Member NCRC, HEC and Approved PhD Supervisor, Pakistan Engineering Council (PEC) Accreditation. Elected Member, Board of Governors of Pakistan Engineering Council (PEC). As a convener/expert PEC, used to visit regularly various universities/institutions for the accreditation of Electrical/Electronic and Telecommunication Engineering disciplines. In this capacity, leading institutions of the Pakistan like LUMS, NUST, NED UET, COMSATS, FAST, Punjab University, UMT, IIU, Bahria University.

Topic: Implementation and working of new Outcome Based Education (OBE) in Pakistan

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Prof. D. M. Akbar Hussain has been working in the academia and industry for the last 38 years, he has the privilege of working in three different continents that is ASIA, EUROPE and NORTH AMERICA. He has been on editorial boards of over 50 Journals, guest editor and editors for a lot many Journals, he has been examiner for over 50 PhD degree exams, he has been distinguished/invited speaker for many conferences. He has published about 150 papers in Journals and international conferences. Presently he is working as an associate professor in the department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University Denmark. He holds a PhD degree in Control Engineering from the Faculty of Engineering and Applied Sciences (EAPS), University of Sussex ENGLAND, more specifically, in the field of state estimation/Tracking and its implementation on multi-processor systems. The main focus of his research is related with computer and control engineering.

Topic: Assessment Methodolgy at Undergraduate Level Assessment is a hot topic and is very much debated at all levels of education. It has been reported that no clear correlation between high grade/mark and the students’ comprehension level for the topic in question, whereas there was very good correlation between low mark and a low level of comprehension (Jakobsen, A. et al, 1998). Similar findings has also been reported in this reference as well (James N. Spencer (1999). Assessment is a key factor which appears every time whenever a change in curriculum or teaching method is considered, and especially when there is transition from a traditional teaching method to problem based project organized learning in teams. A thorough investigation has been done on developing methods for fair assessment, new demands in engineering today call for other types of competences developed through the studies, competences like social collaborative and communication skills, which require affective learning as well as cognitive learning. This presentation addresses the problem of true and fair assessments with an example of what and how to assess a multidisciplinary project. Assessment is highly debated topic particularly the assessment of PBL based learning and of project organized problem based learning. The discussion further comprises assessment of new competencies like communication skills and social competence which is today a part of the general scope of many university education. For this it is necessary to assess cognitive as well as affective learning. The results of the assessment are used for comparing universities through benchmarking and also for the following reason;
  1. Student’s learning level within a predetermined area of study.
  2. Student has acquired the competences demanded by the labor market.
  3. Student has acquired the qualifications demanded by the authorities (the state)(Document).
  4. Be a member of the University’s quality development and quality control.
  5. Team contribute to the student’s motivation and self-recognition.
Donald R. Woods et al., (2002) describes assessment in an article in Chemical Engineering Education as: “a judgement based on the degree to which goals have been achieved using measurable criteria and pertinent data”. This statement is operationalized through the following five basic principles, which are the basis of our investigation/implementation:
  1. Assessment is a judgement based on performance, not personalities.
  2. Assessment is a judgement based on evidence, not feelings.
  3. Assessment should be done for clearly identified purpose and with clearly identified performance conditions.
  4. Assessment is a judgement done in context of published goals, measurable criteria, and pertinent, agreed upon forms of evidence.
  5. Assessment should be based on multidimensional evidence.

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Prof. Dr. Hammad Omer is an Assistant Professor at Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, COMSATS University Islamabad, Pakistan. He received his PhD from Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London in 2012 where he had been a Commonwealth scholar between 2008 and 2012. Earlier he did his MS in Bio-medical engineering (Medical Imaging stream) from Imperial College London in 2006, where he was honored with Bargarit Scholar of the year award for his outstanding performance during his MS. He has produced 7 PhDs, supervised more than 20 Graduate Thesis, authored more than 100 research papers (journal papers and conference papers). He has given talks at different conferences held in USA, UK, Canada, France, Austria, Germany and Sweden. Recently, he has filed 4 patents in USA for his inventions in Medical Imaging. He is a full member of International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM), USA. Currently he is leading a research group of more than 35 researchers at COMSATS University Islamabad.

Topic: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Reconfigurable hardware based architectures that could provide good quality image reconstruction for parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) within very less computation time are in high demand. Hardware platforms for specific reconstruction algorithms dramatically increase the power efficiency and decrease the execution time. This research proposes a new parameterized architecture design for Sensitivity Encoding (SENSE) reconstruction. This architecture is also synthesized for Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Complex multiplier, divider and complex matrix multiplier modules are designed to implement the algorithm. Furthermore, the variable data bus widths are used in the data path of the architecture, which leads to reduce the hardware cost and silicon area. Experimental results and comparisons prove the efficiency of the architecture. Moreover, in terms of computation time, the result shows that the proposed technique is 1000 times faster than the conventional MATLAB reconstruction, while maintaining the quality of the reconstructed image. The results indicate that this architectural design can prove to be a significant tool for SENSE reconstruction in MRI scanners.

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Dr Wang did PhD from University of South Australia, Australia in 2011. He received two master degrees from National University of Singapore and Dalarna University Sweden in year 2008 and 2006 respectively. Currently, he is research fellow in the department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Adelaide, Australia. His research interests include control design, myoelectric control, soft switching techniques and smart grid technologies. He is co-author of two books and author of more than 100 IEEE publications. He is senior member of IEEE and Associate Editor of IEEE Access. He has won several national and international grants.

Topic: Power Electronics Converters for Smart Grid Fossil fuels are running out and current centralized power generation plants are inefficient with a significant amount of energy lost as heat to the environment, in addition to producing harmful emissions and greenhouse gases. Furthermore, current power systems, especially in developing countries, suffer from several limitations such as high cost of expansion and efficiency improvement limits within existing utility infrastructure. Renewable energy sources can help address these issues, but it can be a challenge to get stable power from these sources, as they are variable in nature. Distributed generators (DG), including renewable sources, within micro grid can help overcome power system limitations, improve efficiency, reduce emissions and manage the variability of renewable sources. Power electronic converters used in microgrid are widely employed as the interface of distributed generators to the utility. These converters can control the renewable source and interfaces with the load effectively, which can be grid-connected or stand-alone mode. In this presentation, the different topologies of power electronic converters are discussed. Finally, their controls and important requirements for grid connection are explained.

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Dr. Mohd Rusllim Mohamed was awarded his Ph.D from Universiti Malaysia Pahang (UMP) in 2013. Previously, he completed M.Eng. Electrical Eng. from Universiti Teknologi Tun Hussein Onn (UTHM), Malaysia in 2004, B.Eng. Electronic Eng. from University of Warwick, UK in 2001, and Diploma in Electrical Eng. (Power Systems) from Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM), Malaysia in 1998 respectively. He used to be a fellow researcher at University Duisburg-Essen, Germany in 2004 and University of Southampton, UK in 2008-2010. As academician, he is now an Associate Professor at the Universiti Malaysia Pahang (UMP) and an active member of the Sustainable Energy & Power Electronics Research (SuPER) Cluster, which he leads one of the sub-cluster i.e. The Sustainable Energy Group (SEG). Dr. Rusllim involves in technical researches for energy harvesting and energy storage-specifically redox flow battery (RFB). His other research interests include electric vehicles, renewable energy, power electronics and drives systems, soft-computing, control systems and engineering and technical education. At University level, he is appointed as Director of Centre for Academic Innovation & Competitiveness (CAIC) to oversee the foresight, planning and operation of all academic programmes, development of academic staff as well as strategic initiatives for producing quality graduates of UMP. At National level, he has been appointed as a Director for Technology and Technical Secretariat (TTAS) for a newly formed professional body in Malaysia i.e. Malaysia Board of Technologists (MBOT). He involves in several initiatives either as leader or technical committee at Ministry of Education (MOE) Malaysia as well various consultancies and professional task at national level.

Topic: Energy Security: Energy Harvesting and Energy Storage Research Updates Continuous effort in preserving environment and reducing emissions due to massive growth of urban economic development and heightened concerns over crude oil depletions has accelerated researchers to find long term solutions for energy security, both in mobile and stationary applications. As generated electricity from intermittent supply is operated in one way transportation mode, advancement in energy storage technology is urgently needed. This presentation focuses on related issues with respect to energy security from energy generation to storage technologies. Few research updates covering both mobile and stationary applications from the research group for energy harvesting initiatives, energy storage cell designs, and energy management for electric vehicle will be discussed.

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Prof. Dr. John is a professor of Energy and Environmental Engineering working in the Aalborg University, Denmark. He has a strong academic standing and association with national and international level Universities. He completed his PhD from Kyushu University, Fukuoka, JAPAN. He is a Professional Consultant Adaptive AgroTech International, Seaside, California 93955, USA. He is very good researcher and innovator. He has published numerous journal article and has accumulative impact factor 80 plus. He delivered invited speeches in many international and national conferences. His research interests include signal processing and energy efficiency.

Topic: Thermally-driven HVAC systems: Scope and Opportunities For any nation, primary sources of energy consumption are involved in: heating, cooling, humidification, dehumidification, ventilation and/or air-conditioning (HVAC), which may be required for various applications. Currently, facing extreme energy shortage, therefore, low-cost and energy-efficient HVAC systems are principally required. As Pakistan is an agriculture dependent country, therefore, low-cost HVAC systems are required not only for humans’ thermal comfort but also for various agriculture-based applications e.g. greenhouse air-conditioning, agricultural products’ (fruits and vegetables) storage, and animals’ (livestock) air-conditioning, low-temperature drying etc. In this regard, various innovative cooling and air-conditioning technologies have been introduced worldwide. Consequently, evaporative cooling and adsorption/desiccant based HVAC technologies are explored and investigated. These technologies are environmentally safe and can be simply operated by water (in case of evaporative cooling systems) or low-grade waste heat (in case of adsorption/desiccant systems). The low-grade waste heat can be supplied economically by many ways e.g. solar thermal energy, natural coal, bio-gas and/or bio-mass etc. From the prospective of evaporative cooling, the speech focuses on Maisotsenko cycle (M-cycle) based evaporative cooling conception in comparison with conventional direct and indirect evaporative cooling. While adsorption cooling and desiccant air-conditioning systems are focused from the prospective of thermally driven systems. Importance of selection of refrigerant and adsorbent/desiccant is also highlighted.

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Dr. Aamir Shahzad received his B.Sc. Mechanical Engineering degree from University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Pakistan. After bachelor in Engineering, he worked in SUPARCO SRDC Lahore as Assistant Manager and RCET Gujranwala (a constituent college of UET Lahore) as a Lecturer from 2006-2008. Then, he went abroad and earned his Master degree in Mechatronics and Ph.D. in Embedded Systems, Mobile Robotics, and Telecontrol from the University of Siegen, Germany. He is currently working as an Assistant Professor at The University of Lahore. His research interests include Control, Embedded Systems, Mobile Robotics.

Topic: Soft RoboticThe Internet has an inherent delay, packet drop, out of order data transmission, duplication, and other impediments as a communication channel. These factors cause the system to become unstable and difficult to control through the Internet. The velocity tracking becomes really hard and the force feedback also rises to an unacceptable level due to delay and other impediments. In order to address these issues, a power based TDPC (Time Domain Passivity Control) approach has been utilized in this work for the development of stable telecontrol. This approach is based on energy. The energy has been classified as positive and negative energy to make passivity analysis independent of monitoring of net system energy in real time. Thus, monitoring the net energy output at each port enables the extension of TDPC for delayed systems called TDPN (Time Delay Power Network). TDPN helps in velocity/force tracking. It transmits velocity/force unaltered by rejecting the active energy. PO (Passivity Observers) indicate the active behavior of the system and the PC (Passivity Controllers) dissipate it to keep the system stable and passive all times.

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Prof. Dr. Muhammad Nasir Khan is Professor at Department of Electrical Engineering, The University of Lahore, Defence road campus, Lahore, Pakistan. He received his PhD from the Institute for Telecommunications Research (ITR), University of South Australia, Australia 2013 where he had been a University President scholar between 2010 and 2013 in the group of signal processing for communication. Dr. Nasir received M.Sc degree in Electrical Engineering from Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands (and MSc from UET Lahore) and PhD degree . Dr. Nasir has good working experience in research and development organizations. He has given talks at different conferences held in Singapore, Australia, Belgium, Denmark, Germany and Netherlands. His research interests include communication theory, adaptive modulation and iterative decoding, and free space optical communications and wireless sensor networks.
Topic: Hybrid Communication Systems Spectrum of radio frequency (RF) communications is limited and expensive to install new applications. Free space optical (FSO) communication is a viable technology which offers enormous bandwidth, license free installation, inexpensive deployment and error prone links. The FSO links degrade significantly due to the varying atmospheric and weather conditions (fog, cloud, snow, haze and combination of these). We are moving towards hybrid FSO/RF communication system which adapts the varying nature of atmosphere and weather. For the adaption of varying atmosphere and weather scenarios, we are developing a novel optimisation algorithm. We are working on: Adaptive Transmission techniques, Channel Codes, and Multi-user environment.

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Prof. Dr. Ishtiaq Ahmad received his Phd in Information and Communication Engineering from the Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications Beijing.He is working as an Associate Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering, The University of Lahore. He has working experience of more than 20 years in Pakistan Telecommunication Company Limited (PTCL). He is He is co-author of one book chapter and author of more than 50 IEEE publications. He is senior member of IEEE and Associate Editor of IEEE Access alongwith other peer reviewed journal. He has won several national and international grants. His research interests relate to signal processing, cognitive radios and heterogeneous communication networks.

Topic: 5G Channel Measurements and Models The fifth generation (5G) systems will enable people to access and share information in a wide range of scenarios with extremely low latency and very high data rate. It should achieve 1000 times the system capacity, 100 times the data rate, 3–5 times the spectral efficiency, and 10–100 times the energy efficiency with respect to the current fourth generation (4G) systems. One of the most promising technologies in 5G systems is millimeter wave (mmWave) communication. Benefiting from the very large bandwidth, mmWave communication is able to provide a data rate of several gigabits per second with ease. Higher frequency propagation introduces severe path loss. However, if we consider small cells with radii of 100–200 m, the mmWave communication can achieve satisfactory performance. 5G systems should be adapted to a wide range of scenarios, such as indoor, urban, suburban, rural area, etc. A new 5G channel model should support a wide frequency range, e.g., 350 MHz to 100 GHz, broad bandwidths, e.g., 500 MHz to 4 GHz, wide range of scenarios, such as indoor, urban, suburban, rural area, high-speed train (HST) scenarios, etc. These models also needs to support high mobility, direct D2D/V2V channels, massive MIMO, frequency dependency and frequency consistency, and smooth time evolution.